TTL (Time To Live) explained

We live in an environment where time is probably one of the most critical factors in our everyday life. Computing and networking are not any different. Many of the processes frequently must happen in a specific period of time. Here comes TTL in hand. In some cases, the task should be finished in milliseconds. Can you imagine that? Let’s make things a little bit more precise and explain what TTL actually is?

What is TTL?

TTL is the short acronym for time-to-live. It refers to the value that points to the exact period of time or number of hops that the data packet is configured to be alive on a network. In some cases, also in the cache memory. When that time expires, or it hops the number of times, routers will discard it. There exist many different varieties of data chunks. Every and each of them operates with their particular TTL. That means the time such data will be held in a device to function or finish a certain task.

TTL (Time to Live) values

Continue reading “TTL (Time To Live) explained”

Dynamic IP address – What is it?

Each smartphone, computer, IoT device, or any other device must have an IP address to connect to the Internet. Without it, it won’t have a universal identifier that everybody on the network can understand. The IP address that you can get can be a Dynamic IP address or Static IP address, but today we will focus our attention on the first one.

What is an IP?

Continue reading “Dynamic IP address – What is it?”

Round – Robin DNS meaning

After its launching in the 90s, load balancing becomes a game-changer in traffic distribution across networks. Round-Robin as a load balancer is significant in maintaining the flow of data moving efficiently and easily among servers and endpoints. It is also one of the most common and affordable techniques. Let’s explain a little bit more about it.

How does load balancing work?

Continue reading “Round – Robin DNS meaning”

How does TCP work?

TCP definition

Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is a communication standard that software applications are using for exchanging data. It’s planed for efficiency, not speed. Data packets, in data transport, sometimes get lost or arrive out of order. TCP helps to guarantee every packet reaches its destination and if it’s needed to be rearranged. If a packet doesn’t reach its’ end in a certain timeframe, TCP will request re-transmission of the lost data. It manages the connection between the two applications. This happens during the entire exchange. The goal is to ensure that both parties send and receive everything wanted to be transmitted and verify that it is accurate. TCP is a prevalent protocol in network communications. 

Continue reading “How does TCP work?”